Aquila: Blood of the Iceni – Spoiler light (preview pages)

Aquila Cover.jpgAquila Blood of the Iceni
Published by Rebellion UK and North America
14th January 2016
UK/Ireland £18.99 North America $24.99
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Script: Gordon Rennie
Art: Patrick Goddard, Leigh Gallagher
Colours: Dylan Teague, Gary Caldwell
Letters: Simon Bowland, Ellie De Ville, Annie Parkhouse

Originaly published in 2000 AD Progs 2012, 1792-1799, 2013, 1851-1855, 1890-1899

Set in Ancient Rome and starting with the execution of the Slave Spartacus and his fellow rebels in 71BC. One of the executed slaves is singled out by a mystical entity.

There were obvious ‘this is a Blackhawk’ reboot when this series was announced. The similarities end with the fact the main character is a Nubian Ex-soldier.

Blackhawk was first published in Tornado where his stories were set in Roman era with him as a Centurian. On the transition to 2000AD Blachawk’s story transferred in to outer space where he became a Gladiator among a menagerie of Aliens.

Aquila’s intro story yells of his death as a slave and rebirth as an eternal warrior serving Rome.

There are preview pages after the list of Contents at the end of this article.

There are no punches pulled with the violence in this story. With less to compare this to US readers may consider this is the Roman answer to Slaine. The differences are more than the comparisons however.

Both do draw on history, myth and a good dose of magic and fiction.

The two can also show tales from history that are separated by more than a man’s lifetime.

The title of this book comes from the first full series following the Prologue. Later stories travel forward in time slowly and give flashbacks to show details from between 71BC and the ‘present’.

In the words of Michael Molcher, Head of Rebellion PR:

Merging history, fantasy and the supernatural, the first collection of this dark and violent series is also rich with back story and atmosphere – from blood-soaked battlefields across Europe to the dark and dangerous streets of the Eternal City itself.

Gallagher and Goddard’s art perfectly complements Rennie’s dense storytelling as he weaves together a backdrop of real history with the story of a compellingly taciturn anti-hero.

Among the 6,000 crucified survivors of Spartacus’ failed slave rebellion is Aquila, a former slave turned gladiator, who – as he dies a slow and painful death – cries out and is answered by the dark god Ammit the Devourer. Ammit takes Aquila’s soul and grants him invulnerability in return for him reaping the souls of evil men for her until his debt is paid.

This undying servant of evil plays a role on the Roman invasion of Britain, the early Christian church, and even the fall of the Emperor Nero – yet soon discovers that he was neither the first nor the only man chosen to serve the Devourer when he comes up against the man known only as The Spartan.

Contents

PROLOGUE
Script: Gordon Rennie
Artist: Leigh Gallagher
Colours: Dylan Teague
Letters: Simon Bowland
Originaly published in 2000 AD Prog 2012

BLOOD OF THE ICENI
Script: Gordon Rennie
Artist: Leigh Gallagher
Colours: Gary Caldwell
Letters: Simon Bowland
Originaly published in 2000 AD Progs 1792-1799

QUO VADIS, DOMINE?
Script: Gordon Rennie
Artist: Leigh Gallagher
Colours: Gary Caldwell
Letters: Simon Bowland
Originaly published in 2000 AD Prog 2013

WHERE ALL ROADS LEAD
Script: Gordon Rennie
Artist: Patrick Goddard
Colours: Gary Caldwell
Letters: Ellie De Ville
Originaly published in 2000 AD Progs 1851-1855

CARNIFEX
Script: Gordon Rennie
Artist: Leigh Gallagher
Colours: Dylan Teague
Letters: Annie Parkhouse
Originaly published in 2000 AD Progs 1890-1899

Cover Gallery
2000 AD Prog 1793: Cover by Leigh Gallagher
2000 AD Prog 1898: Cover by Dave Kendall

Aq 1Aq 2Aq 3Aq 4

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